St. Lawrence County Branch
of New York State

American Association of University Women

Book Group


The book group sponsored by the St. Lawrence chapter of the American Association of University Women meets at the community room at the Civic Center every second Wednesday of the month at noon. Participants are encouraged to bring a brown bag lunch. The Community is invited. You do not have to belong to the AAUW nor do you have to be a woman. Please call Sarah Sachs at the Potsdam Library at 265-7230 for more information.

In principle and practice, AAUW values and seeks a diverse membership. There shall be no barriers to full participation in this organization on the basis of gender, race, creed, age, sexual orientation, national origin, disability, or class.

The list of ¡Adelante! Books of the Month 2016-17 is available!

See the AAUW International Affairs Committee's Reading List!

Reading Rockets' Books Gift Guide - Share your love for books by giving the best in children's literature. Published for the holidays, but useful all year long, Reading Rockets' 2010 Books as Gifts Guide makes it easy to find great books kids will enjoy. This year's list was carefully crafted by Reading Rockets' children's literature expert and is a delightful range of nonfiction and fiction books for ages 0-9. Use it for easy online shopping or download and take it with you to your favorite bookstore.

Download the AAUW-St. Lawrence County's 2010 Books on Women's History for Young Readers here for your gift giving and reading needs in the next year!

Read about our AAUW-sponsored 2009 50 Books for 50 Years: Sharing Women's History With a New Generation of Readers Download the 50 Books list here!


The AAUW Book Group books under discussion for the next few months include:


Februray 8

The Cellist of Sarajevo

by Steven Galloway

A spare and haunting, wise and beautiful novel about the endurance of the human spirit and the subtle ways individuals reclaim their humanity in a city ravaged by war.

A novel of great intensity and power, and inspired by a true story, The Cellist of Sarajevo poignantly explores how war can change one’s definition of humanity, the effect of music on our emotional endurance, and how a romance with the rituals of daily life can itself be a form of resistance.


March 8

Code Name Verity

by Elizabeth Wein

Oct. 11th, 1943 - A British spy plane crashes in Nazi-occupied France. Its pilot and passenger are best friends. One of the girls has a chance at survival. The other has lost the game before it's barely begun.

When "Verity" is arrested by the Gestapo, she's sure she doesn't stand a chance. As a secret agent captured in enemy territory, she's living a spy's worst nightmare. Her Nazi interrogators give her a simple choice: reveal her mission or face a grisly execution.

As she intricately weaves her confession, Verity uncovers her past, how she became friends with the pilot Maddie, and why she left Maddie in the wrecked fuselage of their plane. On each new scrap of paper, Verity battles for her life, confronting her views on courage, failure and her desperate hope to make it home. But will trading her secrets be enough to save her from the enemy?


April 12

Pride and Prejudice

by Jane Austen

Pride and Prejudice is a novel by Jane Austen, first published in 1813. The story charts the emotional development of the protagonist, Elizabeth Bennet, who learns the error of making hasty judgements and comes to appreciate the difference between the superficial and the essential. The comedy of the writing lies in the depiction of manners, education, and marriage and money in the British Regency.


May 10

The Girls of Atomic City: The Untold Story of the Women Who Helped Win World War II

by Denise Kieran

The New York Times bestseller, now available in paperback—an incredible true story of the top-secret World War II town of Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and the young women brought there unknowingly to help build the atomic bomb.

At the height of World War II, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, was home to 75,000 residents, and consumed more electricity than New York City, yet it was shrouded in such secrecy that it did not appear on any map. Thousands of civilians, many of them young women from small towns across the U.S., were recruited to this secret city, enticed by the promise of solid wages and war-ending work. What were they actually doing there? Very few knew. The purpose of this mysterious government project was kept a secret from the outside world and from the majority of the residents themselves. Some wondered why, despite the constant work and round-the-clock activity in this makeshift town, did no tangible product of any kind ever seem to leave its guarded gates? The women who kept this town running would find out at the end of the war, when Oak Ridge’s secret was revealed and changed the world forever.

The Girls of Atomic City Homepage


June 14

Ada Blackjack, A True Story of Survival in the Arctic

by Jennifer Nevin

The beauty of Niven's tale (after The Ice Master) reveals itself slowly, in hard-to-find bits and pieces, mirroring the piecemeal dawning of dread that blanketed the book's five protagonists one winter in 1923 on a bleak Arctic island. The explorers four young white men from the U.S. and Canada and Ada, a 23-year-old Inuit woman set out under a Canadian flag to claim a barren rock in the tundra north of the new Soviet Union for the British Empire. But with a lack of proper funding; a grandstanding, do-nothing Svengali of a leader; and an inexperienced crew, the mission was doomed from the start. Niven's hero is the slight, shy Blackjack, who, though neither as worldly wise as her companions nor as self-sufficient, learns to take care of herself and a dying member of her party after the team is trapped by ice for almost two years and the three others decide to cross the frozen ocean and make for Siberia, never to be seen again. By trapping foxes, hunting seals and dodging polar bears, Blackjack fights for her life and for the future of her ailing son, whom she left back home in Alaska, and for whose health-care expenses she agreed to take the trip. When she returns home as the only survivor, the ignoble jockeying for her attention and money by the press, her rescuer and the disreputable mission chief (who sat out the trip) melds with the clamor of city life (in Seattle and San Francisco), leaving both the reader and Blackjack near-nostalgic for the creaking ice floes and the slow rhythms of life in the northern frozen wastelands.


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